Hair Restoration Resources

Grades of hair loss explained:

  • Class I: represents an adolescent or juvenile hairline and it not actually balding. The adolescent hairline generally rests on the upper brow crease.
  • Class II: indicates a progression to the adult or mature hairline that sits a finger’s breath (1.5cm) above the upper brow crease, with some temporal recession. This also does not represent balding.
  • Class III: is the earliest stage of male hair loss. It is characterized by a deepening temporal recession.
  • Class IV Vertex represents early hair loss in the crown (vertex).
  • Class V: Is characterized by further frontal hair loss and enlargement of vertex, but there is still a solid band of hair across top separating front and vertex.
  • Class VI: the bald areas in the front and crown continue to enlarge and the bridge of hair separating the two areas begins to break down.
  • Class VII: occurs when the connecting bridge of hair disappears leaving a single large bald area on the front and top of the scalp. The hair on the sides of the scalp remains relatively high.
  • Class VIII: patients have extensive hair loss with only a wreath of hair remaining in the back and sides of the scalp.

Norwood Class A:

The Norwood Class A patterns are characterized by a front to back progression of hair loss. Norwood Class A’s lack the connecting bridge across the top of the scalp and generally have more limited hair loss in the crown, even when advanced.

The Norwood Class A patterns are less common than the regular pattern (<10%), but are significant because of the fact that, since the hair loss is most dramatic in the front, the patients look very bald even when the hair loss is minimal. Men with Class A hair loss often seek surgical Hair Restoration early, as the frontal bald area is not generally responsive to medication and the dense donor area contrasts and accentuates the baldness on top. Fortunately, Class A patients are excellent candidates for hair transplantation.

In both Norwood patterns, the sides and back tend to resist androgenetic changes, although the sides may exhibit significant thinning in old age (senile alopecia.)

Diffuse Patterned and Unpatterned Alopecia:

Two other types of genetic hair loss in men not often considered by doctors, “Diffuse Patterned Alopecia” and “Diffuse Unpatterned Alopecia,” pose a significant challenge both in diagnosis and in patient management. Understanding these conditions is crucial to the evaluation of hair loss in both men and women, particularly those that are young when the diagnoses may be easily missed, as they may indicate that a patient is not a candidate for surgery.

Diffuse Patterned Alopecia (DPA): is an androgenetic alopecia manifested as diffuse thinning in the front, top and crown, with a stable permanent zone. In DPA, the entire top of the scalp gradually miniaturizes (thins) without passing through the typical Norwood stages.

Diffuse Unpatterned Alopecia (DUPA): is also androgenetic, but lacks a stable permanent zone and affects men much less often than DPA. DUPA tends to advance faster than DPA and end up in a horseshoe pattern resembling the Norwood class VII. However, unlike the Norwood VII, the DUPA horseshoe can look almost transparent due to the low density of the back and sides. Differentiating between DPA and DUPA is very important because DPA patients often make good transplant candidates, whereas DUPA patients almost never do, as they eventually have extensive hair loss without a stable zone for harvesting.

The progression of male hair loss in Diffuse Patterned Alopecia (DPA) and Diffuse Unpatterned Alopecia (DUPA). In DUPA, the sides thin significantly as well.

Follicular Unit Extraction

Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) is a method of obtaining donor hair for Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT), where individual follicular units are harvested directly from the donor area, without the need for a linear incision. In this Hair Restoration procedure, a 1-mm punch is used to make a small circular incision in the skin around the upper part of the follicular unit, which is then extracted directly from the scalp.

Using direct extraction to harvest follicular units was initially introduced by Dr. Woods in Australia as the “Wood’s Technique,”.The procedure was first described in the medical literature by Rassman and Bernstein in their 2002 publication “Follicular Unit Extraction: Minimally Invasive Surgery for Hair Transplantation.” This paper gave the procedure its current name and described the FOX test (FOllicular Unit Extraction) used to identify patient variability.

FUE, in fact, is a type FUT ; to say it another way, in Follicular Unit Transplantation, individual follicular units can be obtained in one of two ways; either through single strip harvesting and stereomicroscopic dissection, or through FUE.

Therefore, when comparisons are made between FUT and FUE, what is really being compared is the way the follicular grafts are obtained (i.e. strip harvesting and dissection vs. direct extraction). The harvesting method does have other implications for the procedure such as the transection (damage) rate, distribution of follicular units, number of grafts per session, post-op care and the total yield.

Patients differ significantly with respect to the ease in which the units can be removed from the scalp, with extraction in some patients producing unacceptable levels of transaction (damage due to cut hair follicles). All patients considering FUE should be tested for the ease of extraction (the FOX Test) so that those in whom extraction is difficult, or who show significant degrees of transaction, can be identified in advance.

Three-Step FUE:

A significant advance in Follicular Unit Extraction has been the addition of “blunt” dissection to the original technique of “sharp” dissection followed by extraction. This was described by Dr. Harris at the ISHRS in 2004. In this three-step technique, a sharp punch is used to score the epidermis (cut just the upper part of the skin) and then a dull punch is used to bluntly dissect (separate) the follicular unit grafts from the surrounding deeper dermis. The third step is the same, namely removing the follicular graft from the scalp using fine forceps.

The advantage of this hair transplant technique over the original two-step process is that using a dull punch minimizes follicle transection (damage). As the blunt-tipped punch is advanced into the dermis, the follicles, which naturally separate deeper in the skin, are “gathered together” within the opening of the instrument, rather than risk the lower portions of the follicles being cut off. Another significant advantage of the new technique is that it increases the number of patients who are FOX positive and thus who are able to benefit from FUE.

A problem of the three-step technique, however, is a higher incidence of buried grafts. When a buried graft is identified, it can sometimes be extracted by applying pressure to the surrounding skin. If this maneuver fails, a small incision is made to enlarge the opening and facilitate the removal of the graft. If not removed, a buried graft can occasionally result in a small cyst that would need to be removed at a later date.

Another problem is that during the extraction attempt the epidermis and upper dermis may separate from the rest of the follicle. This phenomenon has been called “capping.” When this occurs, the lower portion of the graft can sometimes be grabbed and extracted. When this is not possible, the lower potion is simply left behind. In this case the wound will heal and the lower portion of the follicle should produce a new hair.

Present indications for the FOX™ Procedure:

  • Patients with limited hair loss or those who require small sessions.
  • The treatment of small cosmetic areas, such as eyebrow restoration. Those who wear their hair very short.
  • Patients with very low donor supply, a scarred donor area or very tight scalps.
  • Selected repair procedures.
  • The camouflage of traumatic scars or donor scars.
  • Athletes who must resume full activity soon after the procedure.
  • Patients who tend to heal with wide scars.

The Advantages and Disadvantages of Follicular Unit Extraction:Advantages:

  • No linear scar
  • Important for those who wear their hair short
  • Decreases healing time in the donor area
  • Useful for those with a greater risk of donor scarring (Asians)
  • Ideal for repairing donor scars that cannot be excised
  • No limitations on strenuous exercise after the procedure
  • Less post-op discomfort
  • Provides an alternative when the scalp is too tight for a strip excision
  • Extends the size of the donor area (but not necessarily the total number of grafts)
  • Enables one to harvest finer hair from the nape of the neck to be used at the hairline or for eyebrows
  • Makes it theoretically possible to harvest non-scalp hair ex. beard or body hair
  • Most useful when a limited number of grafts are needed.

Disadvantages:

  • Maximum follicular unit graft yield is lower than with FUT
  • Due to the inability to harvest all the hair from the mid-permanent zone
  • The scarring and distortion of the donor scalp from FUE makes subsequent FUE sessions more difficult.
  • Greater follicular transection (damage) compared to FUT.
  • Greater patient variability in who are good candidates compared to FUT.
  • More difficult to capture the entire follicular unit.
  • More difficult to obtain a natural distribution of follicular units For efficiency, the largest follicular units are targeted, but these may not be ideal for the hairline.
  • Grafts are more fragile and subject to trauma during placing
  • Since they often lack the protective dermis and fat of microscopically dissected grafts Microscopic dissection may still be needed.
  • If the number of single-hair grafts is inadequate.
  • To remove hair fragments.
  • Grafts harvested from outside the donor area will not be permanent.
  • After large numbers of graft are harvested, fine stippled scars may become visible due to thinning of donor area.
  • Size of session is limited
  • Requires multiple sessions to equal the size of a single FUT.
  • Takes longer to perform
  • More expensive than FUT.
  • Problems of “capping”
  • This occurs when the top of the graft pulls off during extraction.

Problems of buried grafts

This occurs during the blunt phase of the three-step technique when the graft is pushed into to fat and must be removed through a small incision or risked producing a cyst.

Hair Loss in Men

The Norwood classifications were adapted from the patterns described by Dr. O’Tar Norwood. There are seven classes of hair loss in the main series and five variations of these classes called the ‘A’ series. If you compare your hair loss pattern with these diagrams, you can probably see the pattern you are in now. A consultation with us can help you determine how extensive your hair loss may become.

Norwood Classification:

The Norwood classification, published in 1975 by Dr. O’tar Norwood, is the most widely used classification for hair loss in men. It defines two major patterns and several less common types (see the chart below). In the regular Norwood pattern, two areas of hair loss–a bitemporal recession and thinning crown–gradually enlarge and coalesce until the entire front, top and crown (vertex) of the scalp are bald.


Norwood1

  • Class I: represents an adolescent or juvenile hairline and it not actually balding. The adolescent hairline generally rests on the upper brow crease.
  • Class II: indicates a progression to the adult or mature hairline that sits a finger’s breath (1.5cm) above the upper brow crease, with some temporal recession. This also does not represent balding.
  • Class III: is the earliest stage of male hair loss. It is characterized by a deepening temporal recession. Class III Vertex represents early hair loss in the crown (vertex).
  • Class IV: Is characterized by further frontal hair loss and enlargement of vertex, but there is still a solid band of hair across top separating front and vertex.
  • Class V: the bald areas in the front and crown continue to enlarge and the bridge of hair separating the two areas begins to break down.
  • Class VI: occurs when the connecting bridge of hair disappears leaving a single large bald area on the front and top of the scalp. The hair on the sides of the scalp remains relatively high.
  • Class VII: patients have extensive hair loss with only a wreath of hair remaining in the back and sides of the scalp.

Norwood Class A:

The Norwood Class A patterns are characterized by a front to back progression of hair loss. Norwood Class A’s lack the connecting bridge across the top of the scalp and generally have more limited hair loss in the crown, even when advanced.


Norwood2
The Norwood Class A patterns are less common than the regular pattern (<10%), but are significant because of the fact that, since the hair loss is most dramatic in the front, the patients look very bald even when the hair loss is minimal. Men with Class A hair loss often seek surgical Hair Restoration early, as the frontal bald area is not generally responsive to medication and the dense donor area contrasts and accentuates the baldness on top. Fortunately, Class A patients are excellent candidates for hair transplantation.

In both Norwood patterns, the sides and back tend to resist androgenetic changes, although the sides may exhibit significant thinning in old age (senile alopecia.)

Diffuse Patterned and Unpatterned Alopecia:

Two other types of genetic hair loss in men not often considered by doctors, “Diffuse Patterned Alopecia” and “Diffuse Unpatterned Alopecia,” pose a significant challenge both in diagnosis and in patient management. Understanding these conditions is crucial to the evaluation of hair loss in both men and women, particularly those that are young when the diagnoses may be easily missed, as they may indicate that a patient is not a candidate for surgery.


Norwood3
Diffuse Patterned Alopecia (DPA): is an androgenetic alopecia manifested as diffuse thinning in the front, top and crown, with a stable permanent zone. In DPA, the entire top of the scalp gradually miniaturizes (thins) without passing through the typical Norwood stages.

Diffuse Unpatterned Alopecia (DUPA): is also androgenetic, but lacks a stable permanent zone and affects men much less often than DPA. DUPA tends to advance faster than DPA and end up in a horseshoe pattern resembling the Norwood class VII. However, unlike the Norwood VII, the DUPA horseshoe can look almost transparent due to the low density of the back and sides. Differentiating between DPA and DUPA is very important because DPA patients often make good transplant candidates, whereas DUPA patients almost never do, as they eventually have extensive hair loss without a stable zone for harvesting.

The progression of male hair loss in Diffuse Patterned Alopecia (DPA) and Diffuse Unpatterned Alopecia (DUPA). In DUPA, the sides thin significantly as well.

Hair Loss in Women

Hair loss is relatively common in women with about 30% experiencing at least some degree of thinning in their lifetime. Because female hair loss tends to be diffuse (less hair all over), rather than showing the characteristic “patterned alopecia” of men, and the fact that the frontal hairline in women is often maintained, there is a misconception that hair loss in women is rare – but it is not.

The psychological effects of hair loss can be significant, and many women are emotionally affected even when thinning is in its very early stages. This is, in part, due to the assumption that few women lose their hair and that, in contrast to men, where it is “OK to be bald,” any hair loss in women is socially unacceptable. Both of these erroneous perceptions make dealing with hair loss particularly difficult for women.

To add to the problem, the widely used medication, Finasteride, is not indicated for women, so there is a perception that medical progress in treating female hair loss is not as advanced, or that the medical community does not take the treatment of female hair loss as seriously. Lastly, because hair loss in women can so often be disguised with existing hair, many women choose to hide their hair loss from others. Not sharing their problem tends to isolate them and makes the ability to deal with their hair loss more difficult.

Hair loss in women is generally very gradual, with the rate accelerating during pregnancy and at menopause. It is more often cyclical than in men, with seasonal changes that reverse themselves, and it is more easily affected by hormonal changes, medical conditions, and external factors.

Fortunately, since most of the time women’s hair loss is relatively mild and progresses very slowly, it is rare for women to lose so much hair that they can’t hide the thinning with creative styling techniques and it is extremely uncommon for women to develop an area that is totally devoid of hair.

The most common pattern of hair loss in women is diffuse and since a diffuse pattern can be caused by a number of medical conditions other than common genetic hair loss, a thorough evaluation is particularly important. If an underlying medical cause can be found and treated, the hair loss can often be reversed.

The development of new surgical techniques, particularly Follicular Unit Hair Transplantation, allow many women who are losing their hair to have a completely natural restoration. When performed on a good candidate, this hair transplant procedure can produce a dramatic change in a woman’s appearance.

It is particularly important, however, for any women considering a surgical solution, to have a careful physical examination to make sure that the diagnosis is correct and to determine that they have an adequate donor hair supply. For those women in whom surgical Hair Restoration is indicated, special surgical skills are required to achieve optimal results. It is a mistake for a surgeon to assume that hair loss in women can be treated the same way as in men.

The Causes of Hair Loss in Women:

Diffuse Hair Loss:

The most common type of hair loss in women occurs in a diffuse pattern. Diffuse hair loss is most often hereditary, but it can also be caused by underlying medical conditions, medications, and other factors. Common or “hereditary” baldness in women, also called female pattern alopecia, is genetic and can come either the mother’s or father’s side of the family. It is caused by the actions of two enzymes; aromatase (which is found predominantly in women) and 5-a reductase (which is found in both women and men).


HTW1
Women have half the amount of 5-a reductase compared to men, but have higher levels of the enzyme aromatase, especially at their frontal hairline. Aromatase is responsible for the formation of the female hormones estrone and estradiol. It also decreases the formation of DHT. Its presence in women may help to explain why the presentation of female hair loss is so different than in males, particularly with respect to the preservation of the frontal hairline. It may also explain why women have a poor response to the drug finasteride (Propecia), a medication widely used to treat hair loss in men that works by blocking the formation of DHT.

Women’s hair seems to be particularly sensitive to underlying medical conditions. Since “systemic” problems often cause a diffuse type of hair loss pattern that can be confused with genetic balding, it is important that women with undiagnosed hair loss, be properly evaluated. Medical conditions that produce a diffuse pattern include:

Medical conditions that can cause diffuse hair loss in women:

Obstetric and gynecologic conditions such as post-partum and post-menopausal states or ovarian tumors

  • Anemia – iron deficiency
  • Thyroid disease
  • Connective tissue diseases such as Lupus
  • Nutritional – crash diets, bulimia, protein/calorie deficiency, essential fatty acid or zinc deficiency, malabsorbtion, hypervitaminosis A
  • Stress – surgical procedures, general anesthesia, and severe emotional problems

A relatively large number of drugs can cause “telogen effluvium,” a condition where hair is shifted into a resting stage and then several months later shed. Fortunately, this shedding is reversible if the medication is stopped. Chemotherapy causes a diffuse type of hair loss called “anagen effluvium” that can be very extensive, but often reversible when the medication is stopped.

Localized Hair Loss:

Although there are a host of dermatologic conditions that cause hair loss, they produce a pattern that is different from the diffuse pattern of genetic hair loss commonly seen in women and are easily differentiated from it by a dermatologist. Localized hair loss in women may be sub-divided into scarring and non-scarring types.

Alopecia Areata is a genetic, auto-immune disease that typifies the non-scarring type. It manifests with the sudden onset of discrete round patches of hair loss associated with normal skin. It can be treated with local injections of steroids.

Scarring Alopecia can be caused by a variety of medical or dermatologic conditions such as Lupus, Lichen Planus, or local radiation therapy. Hair loss from injuries, or from local medical problems that have been cured, are usually amenable to hair transplantation. Radiotherapy can cause both scarring and non-scarring localized hair loss and it also can be treated with surgical Hair Restoration if the area is not too large.Localized female hair loss that occurs around the hairline after face-lift surgery may be permanent.

Traction Alopecia, the hair loss that occurs with constant tugging on the follicles, can also be permanent if the habit persists for a long period of time. Both of these conditions can be treated with hair transplantation.

Patterned Hair Loss:

Women with this type of hair loss have a pattern similar to what we observe in men. In other words, they have thinning in front or on top of their scalp with preservation of the hair in the permanent zone around the back and sides of the scalp. Thus, the balding is in a characteristic “pattern” rather than generalized. Women with patterned hair loss and a stable donor area may be excellent candidates for surgical restoration.

The Classification of Hair Loss in Women:

The Ludwig Classification uses three stages to describe female pattern genetic hair loss: Type I (mild), Type II (moderate) and Type III (extensive). In all three Ludwig stages, there is hair loss on the front and top of the scalp with relative preservation of the frontal hairline. The back and sides may or may not be involved. Regardless of the extent of hair loss, only women with stable hair on the back and sides of the scalp are candidates for hair transplantation.

 

HTW2 HTW3 HTW4

Type I: Early thinning that can be easily camouflaged with proper grooming. Type I patients have too little hair loss to:consider surgical Hair Restoration.

Type II: Significant widening of the midline part and noticeably decreased volume. Hair transplantation may be
indicated if the donor area in the
back and sides of the scalp is stable.

Type III: A thin,

see-through look on the top of
the scalp. This is often
associated with generalized

thinning.

 

The Diagnosis of Hair Loss in Women:

The diagnosis of “female pattern” hair loss is relatively straightforward when there is a history of gradually thinning in the front and/or top of the scalp, relative preservation of the frontal hairline, a positive family history of hair loss, and the presence of miniaturization in the thinning areas.

Normally follicular units (natural hair groups) are made of predominately of full-thickness, healthy terminal hair. With miniaturization one or more hairs within each group begin to thin. Eventually these hairs are lost.

If the hair loss is diffuse (thin all over) rather than in the typical female pattern on the front and top, the diagnosis can be more difficult. The presence of miniaturization in the areas of thinning usually confirms the diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia, however, if the diagnosis is still unclear, a number of other conditions must be ruled out.

Besides densitometry, two other common diagnostic tests that can be performed in the physician’s office are the hair-pull and hair pluck. In the hair pull, the physician grabs on to 20-30 hairs with his fingers and gently pulls on them. If five or more come out in the pull then this is suggestive of the increased shedding associated with telogen effluvium, a reversible type of female hair loss seen with stress, pregnancy, drug reactions and a variety of other conditions. Telogen effluvium generally occurs 2-3 months after a stressful event and affects 35-50% of one’s hair. Over 300 club hairs (telogen hairs that have rounded ends) can be shed per day shed.

In the hair pluck, 20 to 30 hairs are forcibly plucked from the scalp with a small clamp. The hair bulbs are then examined under a microscope to determine the ratio of anagen (growing) hairs to telogen (resting) hairs. Normally, at least 80% of the follicles should be in the anagen stage. A lower ratio would suggest telogen effluvium. With the hair pluck, various abnormalities of the hair shaft may be observed that can contribute to hair breakage and poor growth.

When the cause of the hair loss is still uncertain, further diagnostic information can be obtained from a scraping and culture for fungus and a scalp biopsy (sent for regular and special tissue stains and examined under both horizontal and vertical sections. A dermatologic consultation is warranted whenever the cause of hair loss is unclear.

Laboratory Evaluation for Androgen Excess:

Occasionally, when a woman presents with female pattern hair loss, increased androgen production may be a contributing factor. The following signs and symptoms suggest that specific blood tests might be appropriate to rule out underlying sources of excess androgen:

  • Irregular periods – for an extended period of time
  • Cystic acne – severe acne which usually leaves scars
  • Hirsuitism – increased body hair that doesn’t normally run in your family
  • Virilization – appearance of secondary male sex characteristics such as a deepened voice
  • Infertility – inability to become pregnant
  • Galactorrahea – breast secretions when not pregnant (this is due to prolactin which is not actually an androgen)

It is important that when any of these symptoms are present, or these conditions are being considered, that you are under the care of a physician, to receive a proper evaluations and correct treatment if needed. Generally a gynecologist is the specialist most helpful for these problems.

Some of the tests that your doctor might order when considering androgen excess include:

  • Total and Free Testosterone – the hormone that is mainly responsible for male secondary sex characteristics
  • DHEA-Sulfate – a precursor to testosterone
  • Prolactin – the hormone that enables the breast to secrete milk

Diagnostic Tests for Other Medical Conditions

Other test that are commonly ordered to screen for underlying medical conditions include: CBC (complete blood count) – for anemia, blood loss and certain vitamin deficiencies Serum iron and iron binding capacity – for anemia

  • T3, T4, TSH – for thyroid disease
  • ANA – for Lupus
  • STS – for Syphilis

Localized Hair Loss

Localized hair loss in women is distinct from the diffuse thinning seen in female pattern alopecia. The following are the more common causes of local alopecia. A dermatologist should be consulted if any of these conditions are suspected. the term alopecia is synonymous with hair loss).

Alopecia areata is recognized by the sudden appearance of discrete, round patches that are completely devoid of hair. Occasionally, the entire scalp may be involved (alopecia totalis) and even the entire body hair including the eyebrows and eyelashes (alopecia universalis). When localized, the lesions respond well to injections of cortisone. Generalized alopecia is more difficult to treat. The prognosis is better the older the age of onset. Alopecia areata can occasionally be associated with other conditions such as thyroid disease.

Hairstyles that exert constant pull on the hair, such as “corn rows” or tightly woven braids produce a characteristic pattern called “Traction Alopecia” that can be identified by a rim of thinning or baldness along the frontal hairline and at the temples. This is easily prevented by changing one’s daily hair-care habits, but once the hair loss occurs, it may be permanent. Fortunately, this condition is easily amenable to surgery if the cause can be eliminated.

Trichotillomania is a condition seen more commonly in young females, where the person twists, tugs or pulls out her hair. This can be scalp hair, eyebrows or eyelashes. The diagnosis is made by observing short, broken hairs in the area of hair loss. The patient may deny having this habit.

Face-lift and brow-lift procedures can result in local hair loss in the vicinity of the incision. This may present as hair loss along the frontal hairline, in the temples, or adjacent to a surgical scar. If female patients do not have genetic hair loss, and have a good donor supply, they may make excellent candidates for hair transplantation.

Tinea Capitis is a fungal infection of the scalp. It presents as irregular, red and scaly patches and/or small bald patches with broken hairs. The diagnosis is made by scraping a small piece of scale from the scalp and obtaining a bit of hair for testing. The specimens are sent for special fungal stains and cultures.

Pseudopalade is a non-specific scarring alopecia that generally starts on the top of the scalp and extends into the surrounding hair bearing areas with finger-like extensions. The areas look smooth and white due to the scarring and loss of hair follicles.

Lichen Plano-pilaris is an inflammatory condition of the scalp that presents with redness, scale and localized areas of hair loss. There is a characteristic scaling at the edge of each balding patch.

Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE) is the localized form of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), a potentially serious autoimmune disease. The localized form presents with red, scaly, pigmented patches of scarred skin. The localized form of the disease is mostly a cosmetic problem, but patients must be evaluated for the systemic disease as well with specific blood tests such as an ANA. SLE can cause diffuse (generalized) hair loss and both the local and systemic forms of the disease may cause sensitivity to the sun.

Hair Transplant Package & Costs

Number of
Follicular Unit
Grafts
Corresponding
Number of Hair
Package Cost
(in Rupees)
Procedure Time
under Local
Anaesthesia
500 +(approx. 550) 900 – 1000 hair 45,000/- 4 – 5 hours
750 +(approx. 820) 1400 – 1500 hair 55,000/- 5 – 6 hours
1000 +(approx. 1100) 1800 – 2000 hair 60,000/- 6 – 7 hours
1250 +(approx. 1370) 2300 – 2500 hair 70,000/- 7 – 8 hours
1500 +(approx.1650) 2800 – 3000 hair 85,000/- 8 – 9 hours
2000 +(approx. 2200) 3500 – 4000 hair 1,10,000/- 10 – 11 hours